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Jodhpur

Jodhpur 05-07/February/2018

We arrived via Indian Railroad from Jaisalmer last night about 11 pm but after getting settled; including having toast with peanut butter and jam (if I were ever caught by a hostile regime and I said I was not an American, and they put out peanut butter and jelly (jam) I would be caught out as I dove for it), and hot chocolate, it was suddenly one am Monday. Super Bowl Monday, in some other world. The game between Philadelphia and New England starts at five am here. We did get to sleep but an hour later the dogs started barking. We get this everywhere; they sleep during the day and bark at night. I have made it a mission to wake every dog I come across during the day – telling them to ‘wake up and sleep at night’. So far in four weeks in India it has made no difference.

Jodhpur is wonderful. So blue. Jodhpur, 2nd largest city of Rajasthan is known as ‘suncity’ & ‘bluecity’. Blue because most of the houses are painted blue. Those who live in the States would think there is a lot of oops paint around the place. Oops paint is when people don’t like their colour mix and Home Depot, Lowes, etc. sell it for cheap. We know because we often painted our houses in the States with oops paint. We could not find any definitive reasons why so many houses are painted blue in Jodhpur. The most told reason is that the colour is associated closely with the Brahmins, India’s priestly caste, and the blue houses of the old city belong to families of that caste. Who knows? I still believe it is a simple case of oops paint – some company hundreds of years ago made too much blue paint, and no one would purchase it. The reason is, in summers, blue paint keeps the house cool from inside against the scorching heat. Though there are no historical mentions to the reason why the colour is blue. There are many reasons as defined by the ancestors and tour guides. Also, with them are some associated scientific and psychological reasons. (these from various sources both online and from asking locals)

  • Blue colour has been associated with Lord Shiva and there were lot of Brahmin followers of Shiva, they consider blue colour to be sacred.
  • Blue colour has psychologically most soothing effect. That is one of the reasons why Facebook is blue. Mark Zuckerberg said so. (See, “Why Facebook Is Blue: The Science of Colours in Marketing” @ https://blog.bufferapp.com/the-science-of-colors-in-marketing-why-is-facebook-blue
  • Blue colour reflects most of the heat. This could be the most important reasons for keeping homes cooler in the city of jodhpur which is one the cities of India receiving highest solar power per unit area.
  • Blue colour paint is the mixture of limestone and Copper Sulphate mixed in water and applied directly to the walls inside as well as outside homes thereby copper sulphate imparting its Rich Blue colour.
  • There are two possible geographical reasons for colour being blue
    a) Copper is an abundant mineral in Rajasthan thus copper sulphate was easily available,
    b) Indigo Plantation; There has been historical evidences of Indigo Plantations in Jodhpur and nearby regions. Indigo dye was used for making the blue colour
  • I like blue – but that is most likely not the reason Jodhpur painted their houses blue. We are at the Singhvi’s Haveli heritage family guest house. From their website http://www.singhvihaveli.com/; “This haveli is more than 500 years old. This was being built at the same time with the fort. The family is living in this house for last 400 years.” It is rated #1 of 196 B&Bs / Inns in Jodhpur on TripAdvisor.We had a very good breakfast here for a total (coffee, cheese omelette, toast, yogurt) of $4.50 USD for the two of us. We got the cheapest room, they have some very large suites for a few dollars more, but I did not want to climb a lot of stairs, the bed is soft, the shower is budget but does spit out some hot (warm) water after a while. Overall this is a good place to stay with several hippie types (excuse my 1960’s San Francisco mentality) spaces.

I saw a poster advertising the services of a local yogi guru type of person: nutrition, yoga, meditation, astrology and the usual stuff associated with this type of caper.

He gave me a four hour consultation for a diabetic diet for 500 rupees ($7.50 USD) – we put his notes at http://www.neuage.org/food2 with a list of foods to avoid, to eat in morning, evening, winter, summer, and on and on. Not that it is sustainable but some of it makes sense. He also ‘subscribed’ a couple of Ayurveda things that are allegedly good for diabetes and he said I should stop taking some of the meds my doctor prescribed back in Australia. I did write my doctor a rather light-hearted note about these, though I did not mention the stopping of anything (which I did not do). Here is our correspondence…

ME: I should have run this past you – but I am adding an Ayurveda pill to my diet for ten days (some nutritionist yogi guru suggestion): Vasant Kusumakar Ras – one pill each morning for ten-days – he said I should stop one dose of Metformin but I’m not stopping anything until I get back and we have a look) and a nail size dose of Shilajeet Powder: not asking for medical advice until I see you – but just saying – in case you hear I have turned into some famous mystic – naked in a cave in the Himalayas – and you will know why

Doctor: it would be cold

ME: my Ayurveda medical BS will help me rise above the cold

Doctor: I am sure you are aware that your new pill contains, among many other things, lead and mercury. Fortunately, kidney dialysis is widely available in Australia.

Needless to say, I didn’t take anything more of the Ayurveda stuff. However, the next day, I did a yogi class with him for an hour and a half for 500 rupees. The concept was that I would learn several exercises that would be good for various parts of my body. Unfortunately, I was unable to do 74% of the positions. At times he seemed annoyed with my progress. I would point out that I was seventy and not very limber, but that did not seem to matter. At the end of our stay he met us at the train station and told us many wonderful things I could take and do to become a body perfect performing seventy-year old. He even sat in our carriage until it was almost leaving.

And… being told by our Ayurveda dude that mustard oil as a massage was the thing to do and specifically it is good for hair. Well that got me. Better for hair is my weak point, perhaps I can grow thick healthy hair to my knees sooner and with less grey hair. Seventeen days later (today is 22/02/ and I am still working on the Jodhpur file), we have missed only one day of using mustard oil since getting this groovy information. We do a daily massage (no details provided). It is all good. Cheers!

Jodhpur started as a city around the 4th century AD (1459). The Mehrangarh (Mehran Fort), dominates the old city and is visible from lots of places. See our slideshow  that shows this grand city at

It is one of the largest forts in India, built around 1460. Our (my) yoga guru said he met Mick Jagger (Rock legend Mick Jagger in Jodhpur- http://www.dnaindia.com/entertainment/report-rock-legend-mick-jagger-in-jodhpur-1130239) at the fort several years earlier. Not that I did not believe him so I looked up the event and sure enough Mick was there at the time my yogi person said he met him.

We spent the day walking around the fort. From our hotel it is five minutes to the fort up very winding narrow streets. Unbelievably motor scooters, tuk tuks, cows and people get past each other. There is a lot of climbing and from the direction we went there was no entrance fees.

The museum at the top charges about 700 rupees each, plus a hundred to take your own photos, and fifty to take an elevator to the top. As we went past our budget with sightseeing in Jaisalmer we didn’t cough up the $24 USD to tour the museum.

As we do in all cities we managed to get lost, though never far from the fort. We saw several signs for Shahi Heritage, as a place to eat, and had a tasty lunch of tomato soup and pizza. I have gone off my low-carb diet I have been on for years to keep my blood-sugars low. Surprisingly, my blood sugars have been about 6.3 in the morning, in Adelaide they were in the mid-7s. not sure why my blood sugars are better here. It could because we walk so much every day, also, I eat less, as the food is a bit spicy, and I can only eat so much at a time. This was another old Haveli (350 years old). Don’t expect Australian or US standards, but funky is good. Having handy wipes is good to use frequently and drinking only bottled water and eating boiled or well-cooked food is best.

We travel a lot and have never been thingy about any nationality. However, saying that, there are a lot of French people everywhere we go, maybe the cold months are sending them here, but we have found them very unfriendly, almost to the person. They will seemingly go out of their way to ignore us or not respond. It is not a language barrier, we smile and say a greeting, but no response. The only French people who have spoken with us was a black couple or are currently living in India. Not sure why this is. We have not come across any Australians, a few from the states, we heard a German tour group today, and lots of French, and a few British.

What has been interesting, at least for me, is that I get a lot of compliments for my moustache. People will ask to get a selfie with me, or just come out and say, ‘I like your moustache’. No one says that in Australia. My wife has never even said that. We watched (young) people using zip lines over the battlements and lakes of Mehrangarh Fort. It is rated the No.1 activity in Jodhpur by Tripadvisor. I made a short 20 second clip of a rider at

Narda was having some stomach problems, probably left over from Delhi (belly) a couple of weeks earlier so we went to the local hospital. We took a tuk tuk which we are told are referred to as auto-rickshaws, and as soon as we stepped out of our chariot we were quickly escorted through the hospital and to the emergency room. Narda believes they do that with everyone, I thought it was rather quick and I saw many people laying around on the floor in the lobby and along the corridors of the hospital. She got to see one of the head doctors, who BTW, had the same surname as the hospital and a fellow told me in fact it was his family’s hospital. Being used to western hospitals we declined the invitation to spend the night and to have blood tests and whatever else was on offer. Narda was prescribed several pills (which were also on the Australian Travel Doctors list) and we got out as soon as possible. The cost for an emergency visit with a head doctor set us back 500 rupees ($7.50 USD) which we will not claim on our $200 deductable travel insurance. The medications were around 400 rupees for a couple of weeks supplies of four different drugs, each of which even on Medicare in Australia cost much more.

On the way home in the evening we came across a wedding celebration. It is amazing how what would be a one-way street in most cities a parade can go forth with traffic going both ways; traffic including horses, cows, camels, tuk tuks, cars, lots of people, and in the midst a marching band. See our clip at –

Below is the preparation we saw earlier in the day of some camels to haul folks through crowded streets. The groom gets to ride on a white horse. Narda and I had our wedding at the end of a jetty in South Australia and had a mob of family and friends, twenty-years ago, and we cooked them breakfast. Perhaps I can convince her into doing it again like they do it here; with me on a white horse, she can ride a camel and we can have a band.A shot of a typical health and safety issue; a motor scooter with four tanks of flammable liquid weaving in and out of rush-hour traffic (24/7)

Not all horses are in parades, here by the clock-tower (some famous landmark) they line up to take folks to destinations we could not imagine. The death of a motor scooter is always sad.Everywhere we go they love Narda and want to have a selfie with her. Squirrels look the same as New York squirrels, but they are much more aggressive. We sat down for coffee and Narda had a donut and a couple jumped on the table and went for her prized possession – first donut in India. They do not scare easily and keep returning, we gave this, acting cute to get brekky squirrel something and of course every squirrel in Jodhpur came running over. On our last day we visited the Rao Jodha Desert Rock Garden. ‘The visitors centre is housed in a 17th century gateway into Jodhpur city, known as SInghoria Pol.’ Inside the garden we had a great view of the city wall which dominants the landscaper of Jodhpur, we saw volcanic rock, birds (we don’t know one from another, but they are there), Devkund Lake and other stuff. We were unable to find any reptiles as they advertised (lizards, skinks, and geckos). From their brochure:

‘About a third of the Thar Desert is rocky, which is a much more harsh, unforgiving habitat than sandy desert…’

And that was our week in Jodhpur.

Next stop is Mumbai, overnight train (17 hours)…

 

 

Days 19 – 21 of retirement world tour reunions

E-book storefront http://neuage.papertrell.com/
new photo-textual fun – HERE

Day 19 – DC ~ Baltimore

15-12-2016 Wednesday

The rumour of a polar-vortex starting tomorrow got us out the door and heading north. I had thought that it would be interesting to go past where I used to live @ 1719 Broadway Rd
Lutherville Timonium, MD 21093 in 1977 – 1978 or so for a couple of years. The only reason I know this address is because it has been listed online under ‘Marriage & Family Counselors’ and/or ‘Individual and family services’ for about twenty years. Go figure. Firstly, I am far from a family counsellor, especially marriage. And there is not just one listing but many. (under Terrell Adsit which was my name at the time – having changed it to Neuage in 1980) I am amazed how it stays there. Perhaps back in the 1990s when I was a single parent I put that in for a joke but I do not recall. I am listed in Maryland’s top counsellors pages too. Good grief. I did enjoy living in Lutherville Timonium in the 1970s when I was working as a psych worker at Sheppard Pratt Hospital in Towson and doing art shows around the northeast. For years before then I was in a cult-order that was located in Baltimore then Towson so I wanted to have a bit of a look-see and poke around the area. Once again perhaps I overestimated what could be done in a day. We left our pre-polar vortex habitat a bit later than planned and actually headed out of DC by eleven am with the desired thought of being back before dark. Sure!

Traffic between DC and Baltimore – we sure miss quiet little Adelaide (1.3 million) which has the population of DC (658,893) and Baltimore (622,104) combined with the close to a no-wait traffic pattern. Perhaps few leave Adelaide and fewer come to Adelaide. There surely is no five-lane road; just a couple of lanes up the South-Eastern Freeway toward Melbourne eight hours through scrub-outback try-and-stay-awake territory. But I-95 – give it a miss if possible. We didn’t. Sitting in traffic with absolutely no movement and Baltimore in the distance we manoeuvred ourselves around a truck or two and escaping to a close by ramp with no known perspective of what direction we were headed toward. The first thing we saw after abandoning the freeway was a Dunkin Donut; which of course we did a few days before, vowing not to do again, keeping my low-carb diet low-carbed. But we were frazzled from the drive from DC, which was in reality only a bit of an hour already though we were in dire need of coffee and whatever else they sell at Dunkin Donuts.

I knew we wanted to find the tallest buildings as they are near the inner harbour which was one of my original goals to go to after Lutherville Timonium and Towson and Fells Point none of which we were getting to and a couple of other places I wanted to see. Sometime early afternoon we got to some city street that was blocked by police cars with flashing lights. Keeping the tall buildings in view we went up and down several streets with our direction taking us on some historic scenic street, Pratt Street, where the first thing we saw was the B&O Railroad Museum which looked interesting so we parked, went inside, saw a sign about admission but as no one was around we went in and had a great couple of hours looking at and going in trains and hearing tour guides, watching model train sets and generally having a good old time. We assumed because it was part of the Smithsonian Institute was the reason entrance was free. It was not until we told Chris and Jessica about it when we got back that they said it wasn’t free and in fact admission was $18 or $16 for the likes of us (seniors)… oops. We did purchase a fridge magnet for $4 so we did sort of pay our way.

B&O Railroad Museum: Baltimore Maryland

B&O Railroad Museum: Baltimore Maryland

Being hungry and the day quickly slipping away we saw signs for the Horseshoe Casino and knowing that in Australia casinos have good meal deals we went in. For example, Melbourne Crown Casino has an all-you-can eat restaurant which is good for a low-carb vegetarian such as me: lots of choices of lettuces and stuff. There was no smorgasbord at the Horseshoe; just budget, almost fast-food places. I had an omelette and Narda had some meat-induced stew thing.

Narda wanted us to head back to DC about 3:45 to avoid traffic and a sun setting too early. I had yet to see anything that was on my original list and was determined to see at least the harbour. Getting lost and a bit frustrated, by keeping an eye on the Baltimore World Trade Centre, we managed to get to the water; I took a few photos then we fought our way onto I-95. Eventually seeing the road was so slow and getting slower we got across to Route One, The George Washington Memorial Parkway, and into the night getting home at 7 pm. Bottom line, when on holiday, make no plans. Or another translation: our life is a holiday – therefore, we make no plans – or few and they turn out differently than anticipated so back to make no plans.

Day 20 Thursday ~ Solar Vortex day

warm times for all in DC

warm times for all in DC

Not quite Adelaide weather. With the wind-chill it was -14. OK that is Celsius.  17.8 Fahrenheit but cold nevertheless. We stayed inside for the day; a down-day, always so important when on holiday. Though lately it has been about three down-days for every out and about day.

Feeling better today, we have had a few days of feeling a bit crook, coughing, sore throat, but no matter, a few days hanging about has been the right thing.

Jess was done with her presentation at the conference in San Francisco, so we decided to do some nice together slow paced activities. Had a great brunch at a true blue American diner called Slim Jims. I was still full from brekkie, so I had the Greek salad, really yum. Great little place, we hope to return.

Then we had pakjes, which is our family Dutch scaled down gift giving thing. We bought Liam some stuffed Aussie animals and a little music box, which turned out to be his favourite.

The kids went out for a date night, and we stayed in and took care of the little guy. Watched episode 2 of The Crown, really good actually.

Day 21 Friday to Oregon

Now at the Dulles airport waiting for boarding. It’s not a nice airport; pretty old, long walks, not enough food, and low ceilings. Can’t complain though, ours was one of the few flights not delayed by the freezing rain this morning, which coats everything in a layer of ice.  So there’s a lot of folks here trying to fly United, not looking at all happy.

Day 21 Friday to Oregon

ice on my lines

ice on my lines

Above picture is out the front door this morning – the streets and porch were iced up.

This flight is true of all flights, just the tool to get where we are going in life. One minor difference they have only male hosties – Qantas sometimes has that but first time I have seen this on United. The glorified waiter in the sky serving the drinks is grouchy. He looks like he would prefer to be out playing rugby – I expect him to tackle someone if they ask for too much. I wanted tomato juice and coffee he said I already had a beverage – so I asked him again – he gave me that ‘I am a pro-rugby tackling dude’ look but because I am the customer he did cough up the coffee – giving me a half a cup. Guess I will just have to push the buzzer and get him back for the rest of my coffee. The other two seem like happy larrikins so maybe I will ask one of them.

We got this flight at a reduced rate. We used our United mileage points and paid $25 each which seems like a bargain. It is an over-booked flight and we could have gotten $200 each to take a next flight which would have given us a profit of $350 for a trip to Portland but we didn’t want to wait another day. We make too many sacrifices in life to think of profit over fun.

Travelling of course is great but we have this extra element this time of diet and medication to deal with for four months. I also must keep track of this little device that looks like an iPhone. It monitors my defibrillator/pacemaker that some happy-go-lucky cardiologist in Adelaide shoved into my chest a few months ago. Not only do I need to keep the bloody thing charged up but I am supposed to carry it wherever I go. Someone in Adelaide checks it every morning their time and the thing uploads to their server at one am Adelaide time (not the same one that the Clintons or Trumps use I hope; perhaps in some paranoid conspiracy embedded Russian think tank they are following the rhythm of my heart. Gosh, how romantic). I forget which time zone I am in comparison to theirs and forget to have it with me at times because one am in Adelaide is surely not one am wherever I am. Perhaps when they log into my monitor they get a blank and wonder if I am still alive or whether somehow they should send a jolt to restart my heart.

But all that is the easy part of our travel. Next is keeping track of the medication. Liver stuff, diabetes things, party-heart-parts, prostrate and you don’t want to know the rest, I don’t, and on and on. I love being old it is such a thrill. I used to take pills in the 1960s and 1970s for recreation now I take them to stay upright but travel is recreation and on some cosmic level it all is sustainable. I got the pharmacy (that I support) to put my pills into little packs that when rolled up; with the dates and times on each sachet, are the size of a pair of socks; winter socks. I have four rolls, one for each month – another thing to fill our suitcases along with winter crap. By the time we get to Cambodia we won’t need all the winter clothing and my pills will be reduced to one thick pair of socks size. Maybe we can donate our winter clothes at the Amsterdam Airport bin and have lots of room to purchase more crap to put in our house. Like as if we don’t have enough on our walls from fifteen years of travel. Of course writing this now reminded me that I have yet to take my evening pills which are stuck in one of my pockets.

We worry that I will lose my pills or my heart monitor or some other life-enhancing item like we did last week when we (I) left the laptop on the bus between NYC and DC of course as we explained in the last writing that turned out well and we were able to collect it a few days later giving me a new lease on life.

The really most difficult thing though is trying to do a diet. I have always been a bit difficult with travel being a vegetarian. Of course I have done this so long that I forget whether why I started this fifty years ago was because I needed attention being adopted and a Leo or because of the hippie communes I lived in during that time or that when I started I actually had some belief of some sort but what is so groovy about being a vegetarian is that I get my food before everyone else on flights that serve meals which now day is just international flights. if you want to get a meal before everyone else on a flight the trick is to have a special diet – doesn’t matter what. I am always finished and onto wiser things such as playing on my computer or annoying Narda before everyone else gets served. Now with my low-carb diet; yes, it does work for diabetes – I have been doing it for a year and my blood sugars are normal except for when they aren’t which is when I go off my diet. I do a bit of an intuition calorie count which is probably not as accurate as someone counting them exactly. Wow, how boring. I have my fruit smoothie then my veggie smoothie and my seeds and nuts brekky then for morning tea I have one of my homemade you-beaut healthy cookies and a couple of eggs for lunch and low carb stuff for din din. A couple of times we did the Donkin Donut flirt and it fitted into my ‘intuitive’ carb count just as a piece of chocolate sometimes does. I have managed to survive with thirty-seven percent of my marbles still intact so I am sure something is being done right.

Bottom line – still going and almost seventy which I forget but get reminded by my body when I try to do anything too youthful like skip and jump which as you can imagine is rare.

What does keep Narda and I somewhat fit and is important when on the road for months at a time is walking. I do weights at home but they kind of don’t fit into my baggage scheme so on trips we try to walk a lot. here due to the cold we don’t do much but in Hawaii we would walk most of the day.

Almost to Portland now. Lots of interesting stuff for this next week. We will stay with Randy for a week. I have known Randy since 1968 and he has played roles in my life in LA, SF, Hawaii; 1969, again in 1980  I stayed with him in 1985 with my children in tow (age two-and-half and four) and other times and places. I lived in Eugene in 1969 and visited Randy there in 1992 with my two children and the last time was in 2010 when we went white-water rafting down the Willamette River. Perhaps the place has changed since last there.

We’ll see.

The announcement from the flight-deck at arrival @ Portland was something about that there is no smoking of cigarettes aloud in most places in Portland – but other things, well.. which of course got a laugh from everyone as Oregon is now a legal marijuana state. I know when I was living here in 1969 an ounce of pot was for sale at ten bucks and being sold in the cafeteria of the University of Oregon here in Eugene but it was illegal though no one seemed to mind.

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